A Rose Is A Rose Is a Rose

March 26th, 2012   |   No Comments   |   Posted in General

A rose is a rose is a rose, this is true.  But the same is not true when concerning tires.  Unlike men, all tires are not created equal.  This week we’re going to expand our knowledge around the topic of tires.  Whether you’re replacing the tires on your truck, horse trailer or horse van, there are specific characteristics about tires that make them applicable to a variety of functions.

If you haul using a truck and trailer combination or a self-driven horse van such as our Phoenix Sprinter, you may be surprised to find that you will need different tires for your trailer.  Trailer tires are not designed to handle the loads applied to, or the traction required by drive or steering axles.

Unfortunately some folks choose to disregard all precaution and throw on whatever tires fit their rims.  However, when you’re pulling a 6 horse trailer full of your prized companions down the interstate at 65mph, you’d better hope that your tires are qualified for the job.

For that reason, consider the following when selecting and maintaining tires for you horse trailer or toy hauler.

Application: The LT and ST designation on a trailer tire specifies load range only.  It does not mean the tire is suitable for use on small or light duty trucks.  DO NOT mount ST or LT trailer tires on passenger cars or light trucks

Inflation: Underinflating trailer tires is the number one cause of failure.  Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum psi indicated on the sidewall.  Check inflation when tires are cool and have not been exposed to the sun.  If your tires are hot to the touch following operation, add three psi to the max inflation.

Load Carrying Capacity:  The combined carrying capacity of all the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight by 20%.  All tires must be identical in size to properly manage the weight of the trailer.  If one tire fails on a tandem axle trailer, you should replace both tires on that side.  It is likely that the remaining tire has been subjected to excessive loading and uneven wear.  If a trailer’s original tires are replaced with tires of a larger diameter, the tongue height may need adjusted to maintain proper weight distribution.

Time, Mileage and Wear:  Be sure to abide by your tires’ maximum speed rating as higher speeds generate more heat and overall stress that will decrease your carrying capacity.  As with all things, time and the elements weaken your tires.  The projected life of a trailer tire is between three and five years or 5,000 to 12,000 miles.  It is recommended that trailer tires be replaced every three to four years regardless of treat depth or tire appearance.

Storage & Maintenance:  The ideal storage for your trailer is in a cool, dark garage with tires at maximum inflation.  For extended storage, put the trailer on blocks to take the weight off the tires and use tire covers to protect them from direct sunlight.  Clean tires using mild soap and water.  Try to avoid tire care products containing alcohol or petroleum distillates.  Inspect tires for cuts, snags, bulges or punctures.

Phoenix Coach Works can help you choose and supply the tires that will fit you needs Here at Phoenix Coach Works we like to touch on a broad range of topics that our customers might find useful and informative.  And if you happen to discover any undisclosed damages in need of repair while performing your tire maintenance, repair or replacement, you know who to call.

Phoenix Coach Works is proud to provide a full line of custom built 4 horse, 6 horse, 8 horse and 9 horse trailers as well as motorcycle haulers, RVs and enclosed trailers.  For commercial haulers we also provide a 15 horse trailer.  Our trailers are fully customizable; by placing you in the director’s chair, you dream the dream and we make it a reality.

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